Loranus C Newhall

1849-1929

Loranus C. Newhall was born in 1849 in Lynn Massachusetts and spent most of his life there. He sold insurance in his professional life, and got interested in photography, sometime in the late 1800s, photographing the Lynn area, Lynn Woods and surrounding areas of Massachusetts. These Massachusetts images are quite fascinating, as they show remnants of so much local history. Sometime around the turn of the century he became interested in the White Mountains and turned his lens on this scenic area. Apparently, he retired and moved to Conway NH and possibly took up residence in the Russell Cottages there. He died in Conway in 1929.

The bulk of his creative work represented in these pages are 8×10 & 5×7 glass plates. Panchromatic film was available after 1906 and most of these negatives show dates well before that, confirming that many of these large format pictures were Orthochromatic images. Some later images may well be panchromatic film. Orthochromatic film is simply made with silver halide crystals, which are naturally blue-sensitive. First produced in 1873, early film photos and movies used orthochromatic film, which is the reason why skies in early photographs and movies are almost always white: being blue, they overexposed easily. The orthochromatic film couldn’t see a red light, so anything red would turn black (such as people’s lips). Later, Panchromatic films can see a much wider spectrum of light, rendering black & white tones closer to what we see in everyday life.

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Loranus C Newhall

1849-1929

Loranus C. Newhall was born in 1849 in Lynn Massachusetts and spent most of his life there. He sold insurance in his professional life, and got interested in photography, sometime in the late 1800s, photographing the Lynn area, Lynn Woods and surrounding areas of Massachusetts. These Massachusetts images are quite fascinating, as they show remnants of so much local history. Sometime around the turn of the century he became interested in the White Mountains and turned his lens on this scenic area. Apparently, he retired and moved to Conway NH and possibly took up residence in the Russell Cottages there. He died in Conway in 1929.

The bulk of his creative work represented in these pages are 8×10 & 5×7 glass plates. Panchromatic film was available after 1906 and most of these negatives show dates well before that, confirming that many of these large format pictures were Orthochromatic images. Some later images may well be panchromatic film. Orthochromatic film is simply made with silver halide crystals, which are naturally blue-sensitive. First produced in 1873, early film photos and movies used orthochromatic film, which is the reason why skies in early photographs and movies are almost always white: being blue, they overexposed easily. The orthochromatic film couldn’t see a red light, so anything red would turn black (such as people’s lips). Later, Panchromatic films can see a much wider spectrum of light, rendering black & white tones closer to what we see in everyday life.